Saturday, December 10, 2016

Tony's Top 100 Favorite Movies of All Time: Complete List


Here we are! The complete list of my 100 favorite movies of all time!

Here's a couple things to keep in mind.

1. This is a FAVORITES list, not a BEST list. I'm hardly qualified to make a best of list. So there will be movies on the list that are admittedly sloppy, but I love them. As well, there are masterpieces out there that I have seen and just really didn't like. So you wont see Citizen Cain or Raging Bull here.

2. I am a 25 years old who has obviously not seen all the movies, and, like everyone else, I am inclined to like movies more from my generation. So while there are a few older movies on here, I'm attempting to abandon pretension and go with what resonates with me the most.

So, having said that here are my 100 favorite movies of all time!

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100. Watchmen (2009)
(R)

StarringJackie Earle Haley, Patrick Wilson, Malin Ackerman, Jeffery Dean Morgan and Billy Crudup
DirectorZac Snyder




This is probably one of the darkest super hero movies ever made, but also one of the most enjoyable movies I've ever seen. While it carries the complex themes of morality and responsibility the graphic novel heavily tackled, Zac Snyder breathes onto the screen a crystal clear vision that is an eye popping, and unique cinematic achievement.


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99. The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999)
(R)

StarringMatt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrowl, Jude Law, Cate Blanchett and Philip Seymour Hoffman.
DirectorAnthony Mingella

Nominated for 5 Oscars; including Best Supporting Actor: Jude Law




Matt Damon provides a strong case that he is one of the best actors of his generation in this brilliant homage to Alfred Hitchcock. Beautiful cinematography, on location filming, twists and turns in every direction and pitch perfect performances all around make this one of the most impressive and watchable psychological thrillers ever made.

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98. The Apostle (1997)
(PG-13)

StarringRobert Duvall, Farah Fawcett, June Carter-Cash and Billy-Bob Thorton
DirectorRobert Duvall

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Best Lead Actor: Robert Duvall






In one of the most honest portrayals of a faithful sinner I've ever seen, Robert Duvall shows off that he is one of the greatest actors of all time. As a disgraced minister looking for a fresh start, Duvall stars and directs a beautiful and non judgmental piece of art looking at faith, ministry and redemption.


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97. Once Upon A Time in America (1984)
(R)

StarringRobert DeNiro, James Woods and Joe Pesci
DirectorSergio Leone






This long and haunting look at gang violence and membership in 1930's and 40's New York was a critical and box office flop at the time of it's release. However, like Hitchcock's Vertigo, time has shown it to be one of the greatest films in the American cinema archive. The strong violence, long run time and slow pacing keep this from being an appealing movie to everyone, but for the patient viewer you will be treated with Ennio Morricones haunting original score, masterful performances by Robert DeNiro and James Woods, Sergio Leones final and greatest work, as well as experiencing one of the most universally praised crime dramas of all time.


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96. The Passion of The Christ (2004)
(R)

Starring: James Caviezel, Maia Morgenstern and Monica Belluci.
Director: Mel Gibson

Nominated for 3 Oscars.





Yes, this is one of the most controversial films of all time, and with good reason. To someone not fully aware of the significance of Christ' suffering at the hands of man this movie could be nothing more than preachy torture porn; but to the one (faithful and skeptic alike) who who understands how vital this event in history is to the Christian story; you will see an expertly crafted, deeply spiritual and profoundly haunting masterpiece that will stay with you long after the credits roll.


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95. Warrior (2011)
(PG-13)

StarringTom Hardy, Joel Edgerton and Nick Nolte.
Director: Gavin O'Conner

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Best Supporting Actor: Nick Nolte.






A little over four years ago my mother passed away, making my dad and brother the only immediate family I have left; so you'll understand why Warrior, a dark story of redemption involving two brothers and a father is one of the more important movies I've ever seen. Sentiments aside, this just also happens to be a expertly acted and shot masterpiece, making it one of the greatest, and most criminally underrated sports movies of all time.


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94. Rain Man (1988)
(R)
StarringDustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise.
DirectorBerry Levinson

Winner of 4 Oscars; including best picture, director and lead actor (Hoffman)




I've always been a sucker for road trap movies; I've also always been a sucker for schmaltzy family dramas. Rain Man is what you get when you combine those two things. Dustin Hoffman is a revelation as Raymond Babbit; a autistic man who teaches his hot-shot younger brother what love really is. This movie had me in tears by the end, and is one that I can watch over and over again.

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93. Dear Zachary (2008)
(not rated)

DirectorKurt Kuenne





WARNING: This movie is not for those who need a happy ending! In what is easily the most heart wrenching movie I have ever seen, director Kurt Kuenne takes the viewer on a beautiful documentary created for the son (Zachary) of his best friend. The catch is his best friend was murdered, and Kurt is making this film as a tribute, and a way to show Zachary just who his father was. No movie has made me cry harder, and every shocking twist and infuriating turn in this spine tingling true story will stay with you forever.


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92. In Bruges (2008)
(R)

DirectorMartin McDonough
StarringColin Ferrell, Brendan Gleeson and Ralph Fiennes




Do you like comedies? How about action movies? How about hard hitting dramas that meditate on the nature of regret and redemption? Then this movie is for you. Brendan Gleeson and Colin Ferrell deliver career bests, and Ralph Fiennes, who is one of my favorite actors, nails it in a supporting part as a foul mouthed hit man out for blood. The film is crass and hilarious, very violent and beautifully told. You haven't seen a movie quit like this before.



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91. Selma (2014)
(PG-13)

DirectorAva DuVernay
StarringDavid Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth, Tom Wilkinson, Common and Oprah Winfrey

Nominated for 2 Oscars; including Best Picture. Winner of Best Original Song.




One of the most important movies of the last twenty years, Selma is a haunting and timely film about MLK's march to Selma Alabama and his journey to secure civil rights. Shot to perfection by it's masterful director, and lead by a legendary performance from it's star, Selma is one of the most important, and perfectly filmed movies I've ever seen.

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90. All The Presidents Me(1976)
(PG)

Director:  Alan J. Pakula
StarringRobert Redford, Dustin Hoffman, Hal Holbrook and Jason Robards

Winner of 4 Oscars; including Best Supporting Actor: Jason Robards.




Featuring one of the best scripts in film history, All The Presidents Men shows that you don't need serial killers, guns or ghosts to have an edge of your seat thriller. Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford have perfect chemistry and seem to be having a blast here. The story of the reporters who uncovered the Watergate scandal is a landmark in cinematic history.



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89. Bringing Up Baby (1938)
(G)

Director: Howard Hawkes
Starring: Carey Grant, Katherine Hepburn



There is no arguing, this is one of the greatest romantic comedies of all time. Carey Grant seeking to get a million dollar donation to his museum from a flighty and hilarious Katherine Hepburn is a delight. This is a light hearted, sweet and fun movie that should please any film buff.



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88. It Follows (2014)
(R)

Director: David Robert Mitchell
Starring: Maika Munroe, Keir Gilchrest and Olivia Yuccardi






I am an absolute sucker for horror movies, and I have a theory that the 2010's will will be looked at as the horror movie renaissance. A phenomenal piece of evidence to support this theory is this unnerving thriller. There are few jump scares, very little gore, and no masked killers, yet it is one of the more horrifying movies around. This movie relies 100% on the brilliance of the director who has created a nightmare of a film that chills you to the bone with it's atmosphere and story. Horror movie fans owe it to themselves to watch this movie.


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87. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)
Not Rated

Director: John Ford
Starring: James Stewart, John Wayne and Lee Marvin

Nominated for 1 Oscar





My father raised me on John Wayne.and yeah, a lot of his movies are no masterpieces. This one, however, is. This is the first time John Wayne co-starred withone of my all time favorite actors, James Stewart (they were both in How The West Was Won, but shared no scenes) and so the sentimental value this movie carries for me is pretty large. However, sentiments aside, this is just as quality of movie as you're ever going to watch. Bold performances from it's legendary leads, tight direction and a moving, meditative plot about reconciliation and respect, this movie will stay in my heart forever.


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86. The Minority Report (2002)
(PG-13)

Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Tom Cruise, Colin Ferrell, Samantha Morton and Max Von Sydow

Nominated for 1 Oscar





Imagine a world where a set of psychic triplets dream every murder before it's about to happen, and we have the ability to find murderers and stop them seconds before they commit the crime. Imagine you're the chief of police in a time where murder hasn't been committed in years. Now imagine the triplets next pre-crime premonition has you as the culprit. This is the world in which Steven Spielberg's brilliant, futuristic masterpiece takes place. Full of emotion and action, this is one of the most engaging movies I've ever seen.



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85. 28 Days Later (2003)
(R)

Director: Danny Boyle
Starring: Cilian Murphy, Naomi Harris, Brendan Gleeson and Christopher Eccelston





Danny Boyle's fast and furious vision is a fresh take on a movie genre that I cared little about before I saw this. The manic cinematography, sharp editing and top notch directing set a new standard for zombie horror. Full of scares, but also containing a lot of heart and tender moments, 28 Days Later should be in every film buffs collection.
 

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84.  Dog Day Afternoon. (1975)
(R)

Director: Sydney Lumet
Starring: Al Pacino, John Cazale and Chris Sarandon


Winner of one Oscar; Best Original Screenplay.






Lead by out-of-the-park performances from its two screen legend leads, Al Pacino and John Cazale, Dog Day Afternoon accomplishes so much in its two hour run time. In a fashion that only Sydney Lumet could accomplish, the movie manages to subvert genre boxes, and is a drama, comedy, social commentary and thriller all in one; and it never feels forced or sloppy.



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83. Pans Labyrinth (2006)
(R)


Director: Guillermo Del Toro
Starring: Ivana Baquero, Sergi Lopez and Doug Jones

Winner of 3 Oscars






This is the quintessential fairy-tale for adults. Guillermo Del Toro's magnum opus was the first foreign language film I eagerly watched and fell in love with. Dark, violent, scary and yet brimming with life and hope, Pans Labyrinth is one of the greatest fantasy movies ever made.




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82. Kramer vs Kramer. (1979)
(R)

Director: Robert Benton
Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, Justin Henrey and Jane Alexander


Winner of 7 Oscars; Including: Best Picture, Lead Actor (Hoffman), Supporting Actress (Streep)






Dustin Hoffman makes his third appearance on my top 100 in this heart wrenching family drama. As a workaholic father who is left alone with his son after his wife abandons them, Hoffman captures the anger, sadness and desperation of man on the edge so vividly it is at times hard to watch. Hoffman was dealing with his own divorce at the time of filming, and that real life sorrow bleeds onto the screen with elegance. The movie manages to capture beauty and life within its dramatic plot, no easy accomplishment. Kramer vs Kramer is a studious observation on the nature and effects of divorce, and is a powerful and important movie.


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81. A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)

Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law, Ben Kingsley and Meryl Streep.

Nominated for 2 Oscars








I know this is probably one of the most divisive movies ever made. People either love it or hate. I obviously love it. This film was originally supposed to be a Stanley Kubrick movie before his untimely death; so a good buddy of Stanley's took the project on in his honor, Steven Spielberg. There is a lot to love about this movie. Steven Spielberg abandons his trademark sentimentality for a cold and contemplative atmosphere that you could safely assume would have been present had Kubrick got the chance to direct. This is an aesthetically pleasing movie, Haley Joel Osment and Jude Law are amazing here as the two central performances, and the visual effects are breath taking. This movie isn't for everyone, and I will be the first to admit it. But for me, I fell in love with it's futuristic fairy tale setting, it's somber mood and beautiful visuals. A.I. has spoken to me very profoundly, and will continue to do so.



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80. The Breakfast Club (1985)
(R)

Director: John Hughes
Starring: Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Judd Hirsch, Alley Sheedy and Anthony Michael Hall





There is, I believe, very good reason that this is one of the most beloved movies ever made. This profound glimpse into high school life broke down stereotypes and revealed the raw turmoil, profound depth and genuine humor that lives within youth. As relevant today as when it came out 31 years ago, The Breakfast Club forever changed the landscape of depicting high schoolers in American cinema.


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79. Harvey (1950)
(G)


Director: Henry Koster
Starring: James Stewart and Josephine Hull

Winner of 1 Oscar, Best Supporting Actress: Josephine Hull






There are 3 actors I am quick to call my favorite actor of all time: Daniel Day-Lewis, Tom Hanks and James Stewart. Harvey is Jimmy at his best. Playing the mentally ill Elwood P. Dowd, Stewart brings his typical charm and charisma to the role, but he also brings a surprising amount of depth to this whimsical comedy. Harvey is a beautiful meditation on life's gifts and blessings; one that always ends with me in tears.
 
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78. Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)
(PG-13)

Director: JJ Abrams
StarringDaisy Ridley, John Boyega, Adam Driver, Harrison Ford, Oscar Isaac, Domnhall Gleeson, Lupita N'Yongo and Carrie Fisher

Nominated for 5 Oscars






I am more than happy to take any garbage people throw at me for this, but this is the my favorite of all the Star Wars movies! Not only is by far the best acted Star Wars movie ever made, but it has an amazing female lead in a time where they are severely needed, it has thought provoking story, and it completely captivates the viewer from beginning to end. I know the purists will come out of the wood work to fight me for this, but I've never loved a Star Wars films more.


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78. Seven(1995)
(R)

Director: David Fincher
Starring: Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwenyth Paltrowl and Kevin Spacey

Nominated for 1 Oscar



Before David Fincher did The Social Network, Gone Girl or Fight Club, he did Seven. A horrific and brilliant detective story about two cops, an aging vet near retirement played by Freeman and a young buck played by Pitt, on the haunt for a serial killer who targets his victims according to the seven deadly sins. This mind bending, edge of your seat thriller is a detective movie at it's best, and showed the world what it could expect from the brilliant mind of David Fincher. 


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77. Alien (1979)
(R)

Director: Ridley Scott
Starring: Sigourney Weaver, John Hurt and Ian Holm

Winner of 1 Oscar





In space, no one can hear you scream. That is the tagline for one of the greatest sci-fi/horror movies ever made. And it does a perfect job encapsulating the terrifying and claustrophobic atmosphere of the movie that put Ridley Scott on the map. We are at the directors mercy in Alien, not to mention wowed by a star making performance from Ms. Weaver.



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76. Spotlight (2015)
(R)

Director: Tom McCarthey
Starring: Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schrieber, John Slattery and Stanley Tucci

Winner of 2 Oscars; including Best Picture





The first time I saw Spotlight, I was wowed and silenced. The second time I saw it, I had to hide in the movie theater restroom afterwards and sob for a few minutes. As a deeply religious man who has spent most of my career working with children, this movie struck a chord of outrage in me. It is one of the most powerful and important movie watching experiences I've ever had. In a year that saw masterpieces like Mad Max Fury Road, Room and The Revenant nominated for Best Picture, perfect performances and directing, an air tight script and a impeccable treatment of a very important moment in religious history make Spotlight the well deserved winner.

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74. Pulp Fiction (1994)
(R)

Director: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Jon Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel, Quentin Tarantino, Tim Roth and Christopher Walken

Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Original Screenplay





Put 4 people in a room and get them to talk about the best movies they've ever seen, Pulp Fiction is going to come up. There is a reason this is so many peoples favorite movie of all time, and one of mine. Quinton Tarantino brings his sharp dialogue, layered characters and violent storytelling more profoundly here than any of his other movies. Pulp Fiction is a masterpiece, and there is no denying it is one of the most influential movies of all time.
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73. The Truman Show (1998)
(PG-13)

Director: Peter Wier
Starring: Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney and Paul Giamatti

Nominated for 3 Oscars, including: Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Harris) and Original Screenplay





The first time Jim Carrey showed us he was so much more than just a comedian was in the Truman Show. A Sci-fi dramedy about a man who. unbeknownst to him, has had his whole life staged for the most successful reality TV show of all time. Smart, funny, moving and border-line prophetic, The Truman Show is one of the most marvelous movies the 90's had to offer, and one of my all time favorites.
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72. Full Metal Jacket (1987)
(R)

DirectorStanley Kubrick
StarringMatthew Modine, Vincent D'Noferio and R. Lee Ermy

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Best Adapted Screenplay



 
If you follow me on Facebook at all, you know I have some strong convictions about warfare and violence. So, yeah, it's weird that I love war films, but I do. Very few war films moved me more than this. Directed by the legendary Stanley Kubrick, we are given a picture painted of the Vietnam war as only Stanley could paint. Funny, heartbreaking and some of the best cinematography in movies history make Full Metal Jacket must see viewing for any movie buff.
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71. The Philadelphia Story (1940)
(G)

Director: George Cuckor
Starring: Katherine Hepburn, Carey Grant, James Stewart.

Winner of 2 Oscars; including Lead Actor (Stewart) and Screenplay




This is shockingly and unfortunately, the only Oscar Jimmy Stewart ever took home. Thankfully it was a well deserved win. Stewart, Grant and Hepburn give some of the most hysterical performances ever filmed in this love triangle rom-com. The script is fast pace and almost every joke lands. Philadelphia does more than just make you laugh though, this unqualified classic captivates you with it's movie-magic, reminding you of why you love movies at all.

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70. Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows part 1 and 2 (2010 and 2011)
(PG-13)

Director: David Yates
Starring: Daniel Radcliff, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Maggie Smith and Alan Rickman


Between the two films, nominated for 5 Oscars








I know, it's absolutely cheating to combine two separate theatrical releases and count them as one movie. So keep in mind that I know I'm cheating and that this wont be the last time you see me cheat this way on my list. If you have a problem with it you're more than welcome to go make your own top one hundred favorite movies and format it however you want; but this is mine so sod off.


 My defense is such: these movies are not a complete narrative on their own; but they were filmed like one movie and if watched together, back to back, you have one of the greatest conclusions to one of the greatest franchise's of all time. David Yates has such a crystal clear vision for this movie; capturing a deep and moody atmosphere and always maintaining a level of tension, like a volcano is about to explode, through out this whole finale. Managing to insert equal parts character development and heart-stopping action, Deathly Hallows part 1 & 2 work best when viewed together, and you wont be sorry you did. *
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69. Rebel Without A Cause (1955)
(PG)


Director: Nicholas Ray
Starring: James Dean, Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo


Nominated for 3 Oscars; including by supporting actor and actress for Mineo and Wood.





James Dean only did 3 movies before his tragic death. Yet, he is one of the most recognizable faces in Hollywood history. He is also the only actor in Hollywood history to receive 2 Oscar nominations after his death. His success goes unprecedented to this day. While I loved East of Eden, and it just barely misses out on my top 100, Rebel Without A Cause is one of the most important depictions of youth I've ever seen. Capturing the rage, depression and pressures that often came with being a youth in the idealistic 1950's; Rebel Without A Cause spoke to a generation, and continues to speak to generations, about what it's like when you don't fit the mold the world tries to force you into. This is a powerful and important film, and a landmark in cinema culture.

 
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68. The Prestige (2006)
(PG-13)

Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale, Michael Cain, Scarlet Johanson, Rebecca Hall, Andy Serkis and David Bowie.


Nominated for 2 Oscars






I'm laying my cards out right now, Christopher Nolan is my favorite living director. Every time this guy releases a movie it is an event for me and my friends. The first film of his I saw was Batman Begins, and I thought it was solid. Then in 2006 I saw The Prestige, and was blown away. Over the next ten years I have probably watched it 15 more times, and am blown away EVERY. TIME. Christian Bale gives one of the most masterful performances I've ever seen, and Hugh Jackman proved to the world this guy has much more to offer than Wolverine. However, these phenomenal performances are up staged by the top notch story telling and impeccable direction. Christopher Nolan is the best story teller working in the business, and I can't fully divulge why here because I don't want to spoil this for anyone who hasn't seen it. If you have seen it, you know exactly what I'm talking about; if you haven't seen it GO WATCH THIS MOVIE! Stop what you're doing, don't even finish reading this list, go watch The Prestige.
 
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67. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Next (1975)
(R)

Director: Milos Foreman
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Christopher Lloyd and Danny DeVito



Winner of 5 Oscars: Best Picture, Director, Lead Actor, Lead Actress and Screenplay





Sometimes funny, often times sad, always very, very, dark. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest isn't for everyone, but for the lovers melancholy story telling, like myself, it is a powerful treat. Capturing the allegories that made the novel so controversial and ground breaking; this movie is a showcase of great directing and even better acting.


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66. Jaws (1975)
(PG)

Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Roy Schieder, Robert Show and Richard Dreyfuss 


Won 3 Oscars.





Seems pretty cliche to have Jaws on my list. Do you know why Jaws is on so many lists? Because 41 years later it's still one of the scariest and most suspenseful movie watching experiences of all time. The film ages remarkably well, showing that Spielberg's first blockbuster was well ahead of it's time. This movie isn't overrated. It's just that good. 

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65. Network (1976)
(R)

Director: Sydney Lumet
Starring: Peter Finch, William Holden, Faye Dunawau, Robert Duvall and Beatrice Straight 


Winner of 4 Oscars, including: Lead Actress (Dunaway), Lead Actor (Finch) and Supporting Actress (Straight) and Best Original Screenplay






"I'm mad as hell, and I'm not gonna take it anymore!" Network is what I call prophetic art. Perfectly capturing, and satirizing the times it takes place in. Post Watergate, Post Civil Rights Movement, Post Vietnam; needless to say in 1976 people were still restless, and had some very much warranted trust issues. Network was the offensive move to call out Network televisions neglect of covering matters of substance, and the shocking ending drives it's message deep. This is one of the best acted and written movies you are ever, EVER going to see. Don't believe me? Take a look for yourself. 
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64. Unforgiven (1992)
(R)

Director: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Clint Eastwood, Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris 


Winner of 4 Oscars, including: Best Picture, Director and Supporting Actor (Hackman)






Westerns: The genre where violence is celebrated and the good guys are the ones who kill and do it without a badge to make it legal. Clint Eastwood offers and bleak and convicting commentary on the genre he helped popularize; showing a "good guy" who has killed plenty and is full of remorse and regret. Taking away all the glamour westerns claimed, Unforgiven is a deep, contemplative and moving picture about the nature of violence and the toll it takes on a mans soul.


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63. Pinocchio (1940)
(G)

Director: Hamilton Luske
Starring: Dickie Jones, Christian Rub and Mel Blanc 

Winner of 2 Oscars





Walt Disney's second full length animated feature (after Snow White) is rarely rivaled. Playing at as a funny, sad and sweet morality tale, Pinocchio is a classic in the deepest sense of the word. If you need a better reason, see it for the ahead of it's time animation and beautiful music.


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62. There Will Be Blood (2007)
(R)

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson
Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano

Winner of 2 Oscars, including: Lead Actor (Day-Lewis)






Daniel Day-Lewis is the greatest actor of all time. Period. It's not Brando, DeNiro, Pacino, Hanks or Washington. Sorry. No better evidence is there for my bold claim than There Will Be Blood. There are no adjectives to properly describe the work Daniel does here; I'll settle for mesmerizing. Paul Dano more than holds is own and they shine in the very capable and visionary hands of it's director. I'm a sucker for tactful messages in movies and this one packs a wallop! Showing us that when ambition becomes more important than your soul and when the church seeks power over service, there will be blood.


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61. The Babadook (2014)
Not Rated

Director: Jennifer Kent
Starring: Essie Davis, Noah Wiseman 



If you haven't figured out that I'm a sucker for metaphors by now, this is probably the only list you've read. On the surface, The Babadook is your typical, albeit extremely well done, slow burn horror movie. You could say that's all it is; and you'd be wrong. This is a profound exploration on the nature of grief, and how destructive it can be when you don't allow it to have it's process, and that it never leaves. It will always be with you; but eventually you learn to live with it. Watch The Bababdook and you'll know what I'm talking about.

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60. Braveheart. (1995)
(R)

DirectorMel Gibson
StarringMel Gibson, Brendan Gleeson and Brian Cox.

Winner of 5 Oscars; including: Best Picture and Director




My dad was an amazing athlete in high school and college. He didn't have his first son, me, until he was 41. Ironically, I showed little to no interest in sports at all. Rather than being disappointed in this fact (or if he was, he never gave me that impression) my dad sought out a different way to connect with me. The chosen medium: Movies. I love movies for their own merit, but I also love them because they represent to me my fathers love and desire to connect with me. One of the first movies this happened with was Braveheart. Mom was out playing Bunco with her friends and so we watched a movie she normally wouldn't have allowed me to watch. I love Braveheart for this reason. There are aesthetic reasons to love it as well. To some, Braveheart is nothing more than your standard epic. To me, it is a beautifully shot, exciting story about taking a stand for justice and having the willingness it takes to sacrifice for a just cause. This fictionalized story of William Wallace is moving, funny and tragic, and well worth a watch.

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59. Born on The Fourth of July (1989)
(R)


Director: Oliver Stone
Starring: Tom Cruise, Kyra Sedwick, Tom Berrenger and Willem Dafoe


Winner of 2 Oscars; including: Best Director





A message piece? You betya. But it's an important message. Daring because it takes you on an in-depth look at the way war can effect some one in a dangerous way. The story of deconstruction and reconstructing a mans patriotism is harrowing, heartfelt and important. In a day and age where our options for country leadership are less than desirable, where the credibility of politicians and their intentions has never been lower, Born on The Fourth of July has never been more relevant. Deserving of it's controversy, this is the best movie legendary director Oliver Stone has contributed to cinema, and the same goes for Tom Cruise.  

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58. Skyfall (2012)
(PG-13)

Director: Sam Mendes
Starring: Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Ralph Fiennes, Naomi Harris, Ben Wishaw, Albert Finney and Judi Dench


Winner of 1 Oscar





To me, this is so obviously not just the best James Bond movie ever, but the best spy movie ever. I know that's a not a very cultured statement, and James Bond purists might take issue with it. But I'm not a James Bond purist; I just love movies. Compelling narrative, rich and developed characters, a convincing script and rock solid directing are all I ask for, and Skyfall delivers on this better than most movies ever.

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57. Sling Blade (1996)
(R)


Director: Billy Bob Thornton
Starring: Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight Yoakam, John Ritter and Robert Duvall


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Adapted Screenplay




You want to watch one of the greatest performances of all time? Watch Sling Blade. Billy Bob is spectacular here (and, sadly, not in much else). Often times funny, often times heart wrenching, often times deeply disturbing. Those are three elements that rarely correlate without creating a disgusting mess of a movie... Yet this movie blends these three elements to create a nearly perfect work of art that will stay with you long after it's over. One of those movies that's impossible for me to watch without shedding some tears.

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56. Don't Look Now (1973)
(R)

Director: Nicholas Roeg
Starring: Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie






You ever watch a movie you had never heard of up to that point, and then realize you stumbled upon one of the greatest pieces of cinematic art ever filmed? Welcome to my experience watching Don't Look Now. This is one of those movies you watch over and over again, each time peeling back a new layer. The cinematography for this movie is absolutely stunning, the themes of grief and how it transforms a marriage thoroughly explored and an eerie and haunting atmosphere are only part of what makes this one of the most impressive movies ever made. Add to it a director with a vision so clear and a skill so refined that he executes it perfectly, heartbreaking and raw performances from Julie Christie and the criminally underrated Donald Sutherland, and an ending so shocking and haunting it'll sit with you for days; and you have one of my favorite movies of all time!*
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55. Doubt (2008)
(PG-13)

Director: John Patrick Shanley
Starring: Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Viola Davis


Nominated for 5 Oscars; Including Lead Actress (Streep), Supporting Actress (Adams and Davis), Supporting Actor (Hoffman) and Adapted Screenplay.




When the head nun of a catholic school in the 1960's suspects that one of the students is being molested by the charismatic and lovable perish priest, it takes her on a journey that reveals that deep within her lies something she thought was cast far away from her: doubt. One of the best acted movies you're ever likely to see, doubt explores its heavy and relevant themes in A+ style of film-making. Sit back, and enjoy the best in the business giving their best.

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54. Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (1967)
(PG)

Director: Stanley Kramer
StarringSydney Poitier, Spencer Tracey and Katherine Hepburn

Winner of 2 Oscars; including: Best Actress (Hepburn) and Screenplay




One of those rare masterpieces that defies genre. Extremely controversial upon its release; Guess Who's Coming To Dinner works as a romantic comedy, a family drama and a civil rights move. Forcing the predominantly white fans of Hollywood legends (and real life lovers) Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn to confront the depths of their own prejudice, this movie is a landmark in civil rights film making. Showing a racism that exists not in aggressive violence or overt oppression of rights, but one much more prevalent in our day. The racism and prejudice we keep hidden until we are forced to confront it. This movie works on so many levels, and one every person should see.


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53. On The Waterfront (1954)
(PG)

Director: Elia Kazan
Starring: Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Eva Maria Saint, Rod Steiger and Lee J. Cobb


Winner of 8 Oscars; including: Best Picture, Director, Lead Actor (Brando) and Supporting Actress (Saint)





Though a joke in his later years, Marlon Brando is considered by many the first great method actor in Hollywood. With the likes of Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro and Ryan Gosling calling him their biggest influence; that should give you an idea of the amazing talent that Brando exuded. Brando took home his very first Oscar for this unprecedented masterpiece. The story of a washed up boxer who is down on his luck and forced to work on the waterfront, Terry soon takes on the injustices in his neighborhood with the help of a priest (played Karl Malden, the best actor you never heard of). The story of redemption and justice is deeply moving, and the two strongest elements of this monumental movie are the shocking performance of Marlon Brando; who plays Terry like an exposed nerve; and the tense direction by Elia Kazan. On The Waterfront is widely considered one of the great Hollywood classics and with very good reason.
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52. Goodfellas (1991)
(R)

Director: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Ray Liotta, Robert DeNiro, Joe Pesci and Lorrain Braco


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Supporting Actor: Joe Pesci.





Yeah, this movie is amazing as everybody has been saying for the last 25 years. In fact, it is so well loved I'm sure the same people who wanted me castrated for having Pulp Fiction lower on my list will come at me of not having this in the top 20. And the quality of the film warrants such a reaction. There's just 51 movies out there I like more than this. Martin Scorsese is easily one of the greatest directors of all time, and Goodfellas snub of best picture and director to the snooze fest Dances With Wolves was atrocious. There isn't anything to say about this that you haven't already heard; if you consider yourself a movie buff and you haven't seen Goodfellas you simply haven't earned your stripes yet. 

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51. Boyhood (2014)
(R)

Director: Richard Linklator
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Arquette.




Boyhood will go down in history as one of the greatest American cinematic achievements of all time. I'm calling this now. Richard Linklator filmed is coming of age epic; a story about a young boy who grows into adulthood; over a period of 12 years. Using the same cast over the 12 year process; they would get together for a few weeks once a year until the completion of the project. What is portrayed on film is the most accurate story of a young man coming into his own ever filmed. The risks and payoffs in this movie are unprecedented; and what we are giving is a hypnotic odyssey of growing up.



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50. The Thing (1982)
(R)

Director: John Carpenter
Starring: Kurt Russell, Wilfred Brimley and Keith David





Suspicion and paranoia control the heart of this 80's horror movie classic. Featuring fine performances and expert direction; The Thing is a fantastic showcase of body horror and a exploration on what exactly it takes for man to turn on each other. Though probably not for the faint of heart, for any horror movie fan this alien thriller will satisfy your palate. Plus, this is legendary director John Carpenter's finest hour, don't miss it! 


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49. Misery (1990)
(R)


Director: Rob Reiner
Starring: James Caan and Kathy Bates

Won 1 Oscar; Best Lead Actress: Kathey, Bates





Before 1995 Rob Reiner was one of the most promising directors of his time. He showed that he was the master behind the camera in just about any genre you could imagine. One such example is his foray into horror. Misery is the story of obsession and captivity, and adapted from the Stephen King novel. Kathy Bates delivers one of the most memorable and fantastic performances of all time as the deranged Annie Wilkes. Misery works as an edge of your seat thriller on its own merits, but once you hear the story behind why King wrote it, it becomes a haunting parable. King wrote Wilkes as a parable for his substance dependency. Though he often tried to escape his addictions, they would torment him and keep him captive; all while claiming to love him and meet his needs. Talk about powerful allegory!


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48. Once (2007)

Director: John Carney
Starring: Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova

Won 1 Oscar






If Frank Capra (Director of It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington) played guitar and wrote songs, they'd look like John Carney pictures. John Carney is the filmmaker this day and age needs. With 3 movies to his credit thus far, he has set the standard for the modern movie musical. Sing Street, Begin Again and Once are all worthy of high recommendation; but Once is the film that started it all. This is a prime example that all the budget in the world can't compensate for sincere, heartfelt story-telling. Haunting and beautiful music, extremely intimate story telling and surprisingly great performances from it's non-actor stars; Once is a sleepy musical about discovering life and not letting pass you by.


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47. Toy Story 3 (2010)

Director: Lee Unkrich
Starring: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack and Michael Keaton

Winner of 2 Oscars; Including Best Animated Movie





Toy Story 3 caught me off guard with how much it spoke to me maybe more than any other movie. I laughed heartily and openly wept as the credit rolled. This movie set a new standard; not only for the franchise, but also for Disney and Pixar. I have never seen a movie tackle a season of transition with more brutal honesty and emotion than this movie right here. 


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46. Scream (1996)

Director: Wes Cravem
Starring: Neve Cambell, Courtney Cox, David Arguette, Matthew Lillard and Drew Barrymore








In Scream Wes Craven sets out to satirize and revive the dying genre he helped create; and he more than succeeds. This movie pioneers the sincere meta horror movie trope we have come to love in such pictures as Cabin in The Woods and You're Next. While filled with plenty of dark humor, Scream also manages to deliver several sincere scares within its all to predictable premise. Scream is a landmark in horror cinema.
 
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45. Perks of Being A Wallflower (2012)

Director: Stephen Chbosky
Starring: Logan Lerman, Emma Watson, Ezra Miller, Melanie Lynsky and Paul Rudd





There have been countless, and I mean countless movies that tackle high school youth coming of age and coming to terms with their lot in life. It's amazing more movies don't parody this trope. So you can imagine my overwhelming surprise when in 2012 I saw a movie that not only tackled these themes with more finesse than almost any movie to it prior, but also stood out as an outstanding piece of independent cinema. This criminally underrated movie deserves your time and attention, as well as many repeated viewings.  



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44. Rear Window (1954)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock
Starring: James Stewart and Grace Kelley

Nominated for 4 Oscars; including: Best Director: Alfred Hitchcock




Alfred Hitchcock was known as the master of suspense; this is the movie that sealed the deal on that title. Featuring James Stewart playing against type as a grumpy, commitment-phobic guy bound to his apartment facing a horrific circumstance. Filmed with plenty of patience and craft; Hitchcock's craft shine in every frame, as well as the wonderful reminder of what a tremendous talent Jimmy Stewart was.



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43. End of Watch (2012)

Director: David Ayer
Starring: Jake Gyllynhaal, Michael Pena and Anna Kendrick







In this day and age cops are often painted with a very ugly brush. While there is plenty of evidence to support the decision of Hollywood to villainize cops, the amount of honest, good and sacrificial police officers out there is far greater. Here is a movie that gives honor where honor is due, and pays tribute to the many men and women who serve and protect with integrity. But honorable intentions aren't the reason End of Watch earned this spot on my list. The startling direction, crystal clear vision, the hilarious and heart wrenching script, and the PERFECT performances and chemistry by it's two leads made this movie leave a giant, badge-shaped impression on my heart. Jake and Michael portray one of the most human, honest and raw depictions of friendship in movie history here; and while it really is a tough movie to watch at times, End of Watch deserves multiple viewings.



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42. Some Like It Hot (1959)

Director: Billy Wilder
Starring: Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Marilyn Monroe

Won 1 Oscar.






This authentic Hollywood classic more than holds it's own today. One of the funniest movies I have ever seen, Some Like It Hot is sort of like the anti End of Watch; in that it features the same outstanding chemistry from it's two stars, but is a light hearted comedy rather than a tragic thriller. Comedies don't often age well, I'll be the first to admit, but Some Like It Hot is the rare and legendary treat.



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41. Into The Wild (2007)

Director: Sean Penn
Starring: Emile Hirsch, Jena Malone, Marcia Gay Harden, William Hurt, Catherine Keener, Vince Vaughn, Zach Galifinakis, Kristin Stewart and Hal Holbrook

Nominated for 2 Oscars; Including Best Supporting Actor: Hal Holbrook








Into The Wild is not for everyone, I've heard it called slow, uneventful and depressing. Valid critiques if the larger themes of the movie don't resonate with you. To me, this is a aesthetic masterpiece. Top notch direction, breath taking cinematography and actors who blend effortlessly into their roles. However, this is also a deeply, dare I say spiritual, journey. A meditation on the nature of possessions and the need for pilgrimage. Perhaps most importantly, it showcases the necessity of loved ones being active participants in our lives, by showing a man who believes freedom is found away from relationships, only to stumble across meaningful encounter after meaningful encounter; and who ends up regretting his decision not to put more value on his people. This is an important and precious movie.


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40. The Sixth Sense (1999)
(PG-13)


Director: M. Night Shyamalan
Starring: Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment and Toni Collette


Nominated for 6 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Director & Screenplay (Shyamalan), Supporting Actress (Colette) and Supporting Actor (Osment)





These days M. Night is sort of a joke (though I loved last years The Visit). It's hard now to believe that he was hailed as the next Hitchcock back in 1999. A fact hard to understand until you watch the movie that gave him this all to temporary title. The Sixth Sense is the movie the planted the seed in me of appreciation of honest, real and authentic movie making. Watching the documentary on the DVD as a 10 year old changed the way I watched movies forever. This movie is a masterpiece in horror cinema.


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39. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
(PG)

Director: Elia Kazan
Starring: Vivian Leigh, Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter and Karl Malden


Winner of 4 Oscars; including: Best Actress (Leigh), Supporting Actor and Actress (Malden and Hunter)




Tennessee Williams is my all time favorite play-write, and A Streetcar Named Desire is a legendary play and movie in equal measure. Featuring, possibly, the finest film performances anyone had seen up to that point. It is a painful, hectic and poetic meditation on the nature of madness and the carnal side of humanity. It was also, at the time, one of the most offensive movies made in America, being attacked by censorship boards for it's portrayal of depression, sexuality and (implied) rape. Though not nearly as provocative nowadays as it was at the time of it's release, A Streetcar Named Desire remains a staple in American cinema and is one of the most finally crafted movies of all time.


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38. The Green Mile (1999)
(R)


Director: Frank Drabont
Starring: Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Sam Rockwell, Barry Pepper, Bonnie Hunt and James Cromwell


Nominated for 4 Oscars; Including: Best Picture and Supporting Actor (Duncan) 





Is it possible to make a movie that is a scathing critique of the death penalty and beautiful art at the same time? Yes. And it's called The Green Mile. This is one of the most underrated movies of all time. Featuring performances from a group of stupidly talented actors in their prime, beautiful, patient and raw story telling, and a very important message, The Green Mile is one of the best, and the most underrated movie from the 90's.




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37. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)
(G)

DirectorGary Trousedale
StarringTom Hulce, Demi Moore, Kevin Kline and Jason Alexander

Nominated for 1 Oscar.





Movies that I find ridiculously underrated seem to be the big theme of this list. My number 37 spot proudly goes to the most underrated Disney movie of all time. Now I understand the backlash, the G rating and "Disney" label severely mislead many audiences into thinking this is a movie for children. While kids love cartoons, and ALL kids should hear this movies message, it is darker than your average Disney animated feature. Tackling such controversial subjects as abuse of power, tolerance, prejudice, religion and lust; this movie does it all with beautiful music and animation, and an important and relevant message about what it means for the last to become the first.


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36. Saving Private Ryan (1998)
(R)


DirectorSteven Spielberg
StarringTom Hanks, Matt Damon, Edward Burns, Tom Sizemore, Vin Diesel, Giavoni Ribisi, Adam Goldberg, Bryan Cranston and Paul Giamatti

Won 5 Oscars; Including: Best Director.





Easily one of the greatest war films of all time, Steven Spielberg's World War 2 masterpiece was, at the time, the most realistic portrayal of war yet. It set the standard for war movies, and used a style many after would try to mimic. This harrowing journey into the heart of darkness graphically reveals the brutal nature of war and violence. Choosing not to celebrate the violence and refraining from turning his soldiers into action figures, Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan is a masterfully shot and perfectly acted event.


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35. Taxi Driver (1976)
(R)

DirectorMartin Scorsese
StarringRobert DeNiro, Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks and Harvey Keitel

Nominated for 4 Oscars, Including: Best Picture, Lead Actor (DeNiro) and Supporting Actress (Foster)





The second movie on this list to tackle the trope of descending into madness, here is the movie that really put legendary director Martin Scorsese on the map. Riding the success of Mean Streets, Martin reteams with DeNiro and Keitel to bring us this dark and violent 1970's odyssey. In this story of man who is equal parts kind hearted and equal parts dangerous, Robert DeNiro gives one of cinemas finest performances, not to mention it earned a young actress her first Oscar nom, Jodie Foster. Taxi Driver is often hailed by many viewers as one of the greatest movies of all time, and there's good reason for it.

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34. Memento (2000)
(R)

DirectorChristopher Nolan
StarringGuy Pearce, Joe Polito and Carrie Anne Moss

Nominated for 2 Oscars; Including: Best Screenplay




This is the best mystery, who-dun-it movie I have ever seen. Period. Christopher Nolan's first masterpiece demands to be seen. Believe me, the less you know going into this, the better. Just, if you haven't yet, go watch Memento five or six times; you'll pick up new pieces of the puzzle with every viewing.

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33. Casablanca (1942)
(PG)

Director: Michaeul Curtiz
Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid and Peter Lorre

Won 3 Oscars; Inclduing: Best Picture and Director




When I think of "Classic hollywood films" Casablanca is the first movie my brain jumps to. This is probably one of the highest quality movies on my list. Romantic, mysterious, controversial, adventurous, funny and tragic; Casablanca defined it's era. This movie, 70 years later, is a landmark in pop culture. You have almost definitely seen Casablanca homaged, copied or parodied in some way, shape or form. Look, if you claim to be a movie buff and you haven't seen Casablanca it'd be real easy to call you a poser. Plus, it is President Obama's favorite movie (I almost didn't type that because I know there are people petty enough to let that fact taint their judgement of this movie) Grab a box of tissues, pop some popcorn and watch the movie that set the standard for all movies to follow.

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32. Schindlers List (1993)
(R)

DirectorSteven Spielberg
StarringLiam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes and Ben Kingsley

Won 7 Oscars; Including Best Picture and Director





Schindler's List is Steven Spielberg's magnum opus. Told with expert craft and imagery, this passion project very likely opened the worlds eyes to the reality of the Holocaust for the first time. Featuring outstanding performances, a honest and flawed hero and the cruelest of villains, Schindler's List is one of the most important movies ever made.

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31. Eternal Sunshine of A Spotless Mind  (2004)
(R)

DirectorMichael Gondry
StarringJim Carrey, Kate Winselt, Kirsten Dunst, Mark Ruffalo, Elijah Wood and Tom Wilkinson

Won 1 Oscar





In his most honest and real performance, Jim Carrey captivates audiences in this romantic/sci-fi/comedy/drama. This modern classic is heartbreaking and hilarious; a meditation on the nature of heartbreak and vulnerability, and our sometimes inability to navigate through it all. This is an entirely unique and beautiful film, and, obviously, one of my all time favorites.




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30. Tropic Thunder (2008)
(R)

Director: Ben Stiller
Starring: Ben Stiller, Robert Downey Jr., Jack Black, Jay Baruchel, Danny McBride, Nick Nolte, Bill Hader, Matthew McConaughey and Tom Cruise

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Including: Best Supporting Actor: Robert Downey Jr.





While Zoolander may be Ben Stiller's Magnum Opus as an actor/director, Tropic Thunder is definitely his most ambitious and brilliant comedy yet. This is a movie made by movie buffs for movie buffs. This movie rips apart the motion picture industry, especially all those Oscar-baity Vietnam movies (2 of which are on my top 100) With Ben Stiller playing a Bruce Willis / Sylvester Stallone type hollywood action star trying to be taken seriously, Jack Black in a Kevin James/ Chris Farley type and Robert Downey Jr. poking fun at every method actor in history, especially Daniel Day-Lewis. No movie has ever made me laugh harder upon my first viewing, no movie consistently makes me laugh harder. Tropic Thunder is by far my favorite comedy.

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29. Les Miserables  (2012)
(PG-13)

Director: Toby Hooper
Starring: Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, Amanda Seyfried, Eddie Redmayne, Sacha Baron Cohen and Helena Bonham Carter


Winner of 3 Oscars; Including: Best Supporting Actress Anne Hathaway





Transitioning from my favorite comedy to my favorite musical, we have Les Miserables. This is one of those movies that, for some reason, seems to have split audience member. To me, Toby Hooper's raw and intimate style serves this musical epic well. Yes, Les Mis is crowded with outstanding performances (Yeah, I even liked Russell Crowe here. #hatersgonnahate) including career bests from Jackman and Hathaway, yes it has outstanding musical numbers and a beautiful vision; but those reasons alone are not why Les Mis has such a high spot on my list. Les Miserables is the best allegory for the gospel I've ever seen. The scene where the priest not only pardons Jean Valjean of his transgressions, but blesses him in response to it? That is crazy, unmerited, beautiful, scandalous grace.


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28. Rosemary's Baby  (1968)
(R)

Director: Roman Polanski
Starring: Mia Farrow, John Cssevetes and Ruth Gordon

Winner of 1 Oscar, Best Supporting Actress: Ruth Gordon


Horror movies are, to me, the most consistently interesting genre of movie out there. They get a lot of flack because they are really easy to do poorly and tend to be constant re-hashes of tired formulas. But when they are done well, they have the potential to speak powerful allegory and stay with you forever. Roman Polanski woke people up with Rosemary's Baby; his atmospheric, slow burn meditation on madness and spirituality. The movie is horrific and mysterious without violence or jump scares. Genre love aside, Polanski has crafted one of the most accomplished pieces of film making in history.


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27. High Noon (1952)
(PG)

Director: Fred Zinnemann
Starring: Gary Cooper, Bue Brides, Grace Kelly

Winner of 4 Oscars, Including Best Lead Actor: Gary Cooper.






As I've said many times on this list, I love a movie with solid allegory. High Noon is probably the quintessential allegory movie. A western disguised as a metaphor for the rise of McCarthy-ism and a call for Hollywood to take a stand against the vicious assault McCarthy raised against freedom of speech. Though, even without the allegory, High Noon is brilliant film making on it's own merit. Featuring what is probably Gary Cooper's best performance and top notch directing, High Noon is an achievement in the western genre. It's a western for people who don't like westerns, which is probably why it's my favorite western.

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26. Let Me In (2010)
(R)

Director: Matt Reeves
Starring: Kodi Smith-McPhee, Chloe Grace Moretz and Richard Jenkins






For reasons I can't quite identify, I can never watch this movie too much. Maybe it's Matt Reeves vision and eye for detail and atmosphere. Maybe it's the two mesmerizing performances by its child stars. Maybe's the haunting story. Either way, this is one of my absolute favorite movies. I have a hard time calling this a horror movie, although it undoubtedly is, because at the heart of it is two isolated kids finding life in each other while stick in a world they find cold and dead. Yes, there are absolute scares and disturbing content; but Richard Jenkins character serves as an excellent tool that anchors this movie in a contemplative essay on the difference between love and obsession, a distinction that if not made, leads to tragedy.

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25. The Lion King (1994)
(G)

Directors: Rob Minkoff and Roger Allers
Starring: Matthew Borderick, Johnathan Taylor Thomas, Jeremy Irons, Nathan Lane and James Earle Jones


Winner of 2 Oscars




Out of all 100 movies on my list, this one has been one of my favorites the longest. This is my all time favorite Shakespeare adaption. This counts right? Don't care. #sorrynotsorry. Not only that, but it's the best Disney animation studios has released. It's hilarious, it's heart breaking, it's romantic and full of adventure. As far as cartoons go, this is an undisputed classic.  What millennial doesn't love the Lion King? Don't answer that,

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24. Apocalypse Now (1979)
(R)

Director: Francis Ford Copola
Starring: Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Dennis Hopper, Laurence Fishburn, Dennis Hopper and Robert DuVall

Winner of 2 Oscars.




Yes it was brilliantly parodied in Tropic Thunder, but that doesn't mean Apocalypse Now has lost it's sting over time. Famously the least fun the legendary director has ever had making a movie, this is  the most important movie he ever made. He gave voice to countless, permanently, physically and psychologically damaged vets. Every scene, moment, shot is filmed with intention and craft. Every performance serves the plot and it's painful and relevant message: War tears apart a mans soul, and for some, causes a dark and dreary descent into madness. This is no overrated masterpiece, though undoubtedly my dad will disagree. This is monumental, unparalleled work.

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23. The Shining (1980)
(R)

Director: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall and Scatman Cruthers



The is my 13th (14th depending on how liberal you are with titles) horror movie on my list. I hope that's a clear enough message to the horror move haters out there. Stanley Kubrick is an extremely hit and miss director for me (sorry, Ethan). But when he hits, he hits it so far out of the park you'll never find the ball. Is it true to Stephen Kings source material? No. Not at all. But is it true art? You as true of art are you're ever going to find! Kubrick is famous for being one of the most anal directors in history, a trait that serves well for the horror genre. Nicholson is unforgettable in what is possibly his most iconic role. The Shining is one of those movies that helps to define the word "masterpiece."


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2212 Years A Slave (2013)

(R)



Director: Steve McQueen

Starring: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Lupita Nyong'o, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Paul Dano and Brad Pitt

Winner of 3 Oscars; Including: Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress: Nyongo






Every few decades a movie comes along that awakens a generation to the reality of the sins of the past. The 80's had Born on The Fourth of July, the 90's had Schindlers List, and my generation of adults had 12 Years a Slave. This is the most unflinching and honest portrait of slavery I've ever seen put on the screen. It is violent, despairing, honest and revealing. Director Steve McQueen holds nothing back, exposing the horrors of the day with conviction and style. Yet, miraculously, this movie never lets go of hope and heart. Every performance is mesmerizing; but it's Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender and Lupita Nyong'o who manage to fit three of the greatest performances I've ever seen in this work. 12 Years A Slave is not an easy movie to watch by any means, but it may be the most important movie I've ever seen, and needs to be seen by all. For me, America's greatest sin (slavery) was only head knowledge until I saw this movie. There's blood on our hands. People are still feeling the lashing effects of slavery today. 12 Years A Slave aims to open our eyes, let it.



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21. The Departed (2006)
(R)

Director: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson, Mark Whalberg, Vera Farmiga, Alec Baldwin and Martin Sheen

Won 4 Oscars; Including Best Picture and Director




We have arrived to my favorite Scorsese picture! I know that's a fairly controversial choice, seeing as most favor Goodfellas, Taxi Driver or Raging Bull (psychos). But The Departed is the movie that not only made me fall in love with Scorsese and DiCaprio, but also the crime genre of motion pictures. This is a very complicated, crowded and in your face movie-yet in the masterful hands of Marty (who won his only Oscar to date for this movie) it never feels too much. I've seen this movie at least twenty times, and I pick up on new things every time. The Departed, to me, is as good as modern crime films is ever going to get; not to mention it features one of the greatest casts ever assembled all doing what they do best.

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 20. The Conjuring (2013)
(R)

Director: James Wan
Starring: Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston



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In 2012 I had started to feel like the horror movie genre was dying. For a while I stopped watching horror movies, and I didn't really feel like I had missed much. I hate torture porn; no genre shows less concern to the sacredness of human dignity; so I wasn't sad to miss out on the Saw, Hostel and Human Centipede franchises. And the none torture porn movies? I mean, Halloween, My Bloody Valentine and Black Christmas remakes? One Missed Call, Silent Hill? Yeah there was some glimmers of hope for the franchise; one of my all time favorites, Let Me in came out in 2010, and Paranormal Activity was amazing as were a few others (which I wouldn't know about until doing some research. Secret to most great horror movies? A low budget.) So you can imagine my overwhelming delight when I saw the best ghost horror movie I'd ever seen in The Conjuring. My best friend, Jordan, kept insisting that this movie was a masterpiece, so I went with him, not thrilled, and left blown away. I went 3 more times afterwards. This has everything you could wish for in a movie: Brilliant performances, a compelling narrative, and more than competent direction. James Wan has an eye for what makes people afraid. What I loved most about The Conjuring is there is nothing new to it; creaky doors, jump scares, flickering lights and a fairly predictable plot. The brilliance in the movie is that it takes what has scared previous generations for decades and re-presents to a new generation in fresh, horrifying ways. Scares aside, the movie also has sympathetic characters, a strong emotional core and some very faith affirming moments. All elements that more than qualify this to be one of my all time favorites.


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19. Higher Ground (2011)
(R)

Direcor: Vera Farmiga
Starring: Vera Farmiga, Joshua Leonard and John Hawkes



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Another Vera Farmiga movie! Can you guess if she's one of my favorite actresses? I don't say this about a lot of movies, in fact I try to be very careful and discerning with what I insist I think Christians need to do, but I'm insisting EVERY CHRISTIAN WATCH HIGHER GROUND. This is not your Pureflix attempt at art from the creators of Gods Not Dead, and it is rated R for some language and a few sexual moments. This is a love letter from Vera Farmiga to a faith tradition she wants so hard to be real, but doesn't always know how to make it so. So why should Christians watch it? This movie is a study on faith and doubt. There is an underlying culture of doubt shaming that lives in the subconscious of  many Christians, especially myself. But if any faith tradition should be a safe place to ask tough questions and wrestle with your doubts and struggles, it should be the tradition that was mandated by it's founder to reject shame. Higher Ground speaks powerfully to these themes, not mention that Vera as an actress and director accomplishes the almost impossible task of creating a piece of art that is both critical and admiring of the church.

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18. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
(G)

Director: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood and Douglas Rain

Won 1 Oscar

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Here's another one of those movies that has a very split audience. People either love it or hate it. And even though it is one of my favorite movies, and one of the most impressive viewing experiences I've ever had, I totally understand why some people would hate it. If the themes don't resonate with you, if you don't like having to interpret movies, and if you like your space movies with a little more action, than yeah this movie wasn't made for you, and that's okay. But this movie spoke to me as a profound meditation on the mysteries of God. With this cryptic monolith that shows up, supposedly initiating the next phase of life each time it appears, you see a potential God metaphor. It's the mysteries of this movie that compel me, and call be back to rewatch it. The special effects are outstanding, you won't know you're watching a movie from 50 years ago; and this, in my opinion, is the best example of why Kubrick was so far ahead of his time. 


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17. When Harry Met Sally (1989)
(R)


Director: Rob Reiner
Starring: Billy Crystal, Meg Ryan, Bruno Kirby and Carrie Fisher

Nominated for 1 Oscar

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Here's a great example of why this is a "favorites" list, not a "best" list. In what other world is When Harry Met Sally above 2001? If this really ticks you off, I'm not sorry. That's the beauty of opinions and art. But this is my favorite romantic comedy; which isn't saying much seeing as how it's probably my least favorite genre. Yet, When Harry Met Sally, even though containing every cliche in the book, is elevated by the pitch-perfect script, charismatic performances and Rob Reiner's affectionate direction. Full of heart, plenty of belly laughs and a few iconic moments, When Harry Met Sally is my favorite movie to cuddle up with my wife and watch over and over again.


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16. Inception (2010)
(PG-13)

Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon Levitt, Tom Hardy, Marion Cotillard,Ellen Page, Ken Watanabe, Cillian Murphy and Michael Cain

Winner of 4 Oscars



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Christopher Nolan makes yet another appearance on my list with my favorite sci-fi movie ever. This movie has had pages and pages and pages of work written by people tearing apart every aspect of this mind bending achievement in science fiction movie making. The all-star cast does great work here, but as usual, Christopher Nolan doesn't let those pesky actors cause the audience to forget who the real star of the movie is: The story, full of heart and intellectually challenging. As per usual with Christopher Nolan moves, the less you know going into it, the more you'll get out of it. If you haven't seen, don't speak to me until you have seen it. You don't exist until you've seen Inception.


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15. It's A Wonderful Life (1946)
(PG)

Director: Frank Capra
Starring: James Stewart, Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymoore

Nominated for 5 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Director and Lead Actor (Stewart)




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The holiday classic to define all holiday classics. The only Christmas movie I need  to watch annually. This movie may be needed more now than ever; in a world that is over come with cynicism, depression, anxiety, fear and anger; It's A Wonderful Life is a light in the darkness. A movie that demands its audience to examine what it is that really makes life worth living. Featuring my favorite Jimmy Stewart performance and Frank Capra's tender direction; this is a sentimental in all the right ways classic.




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14. Ordinary People (1980)
(R)

Director: Robert Redford
Starring: Donald Southerland, Mary Tyler-Moore, Timothy Hutton and Judd Hirsch

Won 4 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Director and Supporting Actor (Hutton)

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I have a bone to pick with pop culture. Because this movie is known not for all of its worthy qualities, but as the movie the majority feel wrongfully beat Raging Bull for Best Picture. Well, even though I can appreciate what an astonishing piece of art Raging Bull is, I despise it. My joy that this movie took home top prize at the Oscars is not why it's so high on my list though, that would make me petty and vindictive. Ordinary People is a somber and quiet critique of western civilizations inability to confront and wrestle with tragedy. We move from moment to moment, and if the moment stings, we move fast away from it, ignoring the lasting results of those painful moments. Our inability to face our suffering leads to even more suffering. Ordinary People shows what happens when a suicidal young man decides to confront his pain, to learn, to grow and to fight; and how his parents, determined to move to the the next good moment, are effected by his choice. This is a small movie with a lot to say. Donald Southerland, the most underrated actor of all time (next to Martin Sheen) does his best work here, Mary Tyler-Moore goes against type in an age that didn't allow women to do so easily, Timothy Hutton embodies guilt and Robert Redford directs it all with a gentle compassion, handling the movie as a delicate piece of glass. Ordinary People is astonishing.


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13. To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)
(PG)

Director: Robert Mulligan
Starring: Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Phillip Alford and Robert Duvall

Winner of 3 Oscars; Including: Lead Actor (Peck) and Adapted Screenplay


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Hard for me to even talk about this movie without getting choked up. Telling stories of racism, injustice, poverty, rumors and fear through the eyes of two young children; and how their father walks them through these stories, either with his words or with his character. Gregory Peck perfectly embodies the legendary Atticus Finch, demonstrating his tough and tender demeanor effortlessly. Full of suspense, moments of levity and more heart than most movies can contain; To Kill a Mockingbird is an important, powerful and classic masterpiece. Not to mention it is the screen debut of one of my all time favorite actors, Robert Duvall as Boo Radley. 


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12. Inside Out (2015)
(PG)

Director: Pete Docter
Starring: Amy Poehler, Phyllis Smith, Bill Hader, Mindy Kailing, Lewis Black and Diane Lane

Won 1 Oscar; Best Animated Feature Film


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2015 was one of the best years for movies in recent memory. Spotlight, Mad Max Fury Road, The Revenant, Room, Creed, Straight Outta Compton, The Big Short, The Martian, Steve Jobs, The Danish Girl, Brooklyn, Bridge of Spies... all movies that in another year could have easily been worthy of best picture.. yet, in my opinion, the most innovative, emotional, brilliant and daring movie of 2015 was a Disney/Pixar cartoon. Here's the thing, my closest friends and family know that I don't usually care for cartoons. They have to work harder than any other genre (except maybe romcom)to win my heart. Maybe it's because I'm cynical, I should go watch It's A Wonderful Life... But all that to say no movie has helped me heal with some very intense emotional stuff like Inside Out. Having seen it right after I lost my dream job and put my marriage in a really rough spot, while I felt like a failure in every aspect of the word. I'm not one to beat around the bush, so I'll be honest, it was the closest to suicide I had ever been. Then I saw Inside Out, and it was one of the biggest sources of life and healing for me. I had never understood before why it was, not only okay to be sad, but it's important to be sad sometimes. Sadness gives other emotions gravity and richer substance. And this is a cartoon! I cry like a pregnant woman every time I watch this. But there are very few movies more personal or important to me.



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11. The Godfather (1972)
(R)

Director: Francis Ford Copolla
Starring: Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall, Talia Shire and Diane Keaton

Winner of 3 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Lead Actor (Brando) and Adapted Screenplay


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The Godfather presents maybe the best anti hero ever filmed in the person of don Vito Corleone. Unrivaled in its glimpse into mob life, this movie is every bit as masterful and impressive as its reputation would suggest. This movie gets everything right: dialogue, direction, performances, depiction of tragedy. This is the movie that established new benchmarks in American cinema. Featuring an alternative take on the American Dream, The Godfather traces the arc of this doomed idealism with a beauty that is still fresh.


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 I would be amiss if I didn't give a shout out to some of these outstanding movies that just missed the cut; OR movies that I hadn't seen by the time I already started publishing my list that might have made the list earlier.


 I also want to say that this is not Tony's cannon, the list will be updated from time to time, because as we change and evolve, as does our perception of art, and what kind of art that resonates with us most. You might have noticed no movies from this year have been omitted any movies from 2016, but movies like Sing Street, Jungle Book or Captain America: Civil War are all, in my opinion, top 100 quality stuff.

So, here are movies that could have easily been on my top 100 in alphabetical order.
Honorable mentions:


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And so here we are with my top 10 favorite movies of all time!



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10. The Deer Hunter (1978)
(R)

Director: Michael Cimino
Starring: Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken, Meryl Streep and John Cazale


Winner of 5 Oscars Including; Best Picture, Director and Supporting Actor (Walken)



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There may be better war movies out there, and I can concede that; but no war film has ever shaken me to my core the way The Deer Hunter has. This may be the most horrifying non-horror movie on my list, and horror, I believe, is probably the most accurate way to portray war. (Admittedly, I wouldn't know, I've never been in combat, so this is purely speculative.) Unfortunately this is often over shadowed by the much more stylistic Apocalypse Now which was released the following year and was, at the time, ironically, over shadowed by this film. While Apocalypse Now is one of my favorite movies, it's The Deer Hunter that will stay with me for the rest of my life on a deeply intimate level. This was the first war movie I saw that really illustrated what it might be like for some veterans to leave the war zone, but carry the war home in their hearts. Robert DeNiro and Christopher Walken give some of the most, if not THE MOST, heartbreaking performances I've ever seen. This quiet, beautiful and scary war film has set the ultimate standard by which I will judge all other war movies.


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9. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
(R)

Director: Frank Darabont
Starring: Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Clancey Brown and James Whitmore

Nominated for 7 Oscars Including; Best Picture and Lead Actor (Freeman)



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One of the most uplifting, and deeply satisfying movies I've ever seen. The movie sees these convicts the way I think Jesus would see them. It doesn't judge them or portray them as villains, rather it sees them as real people who, yes are crooks and killers, but also people with context, substance, dignity and beauty. That's how I think Jesus sees us. While there is plenty of metaphors to be found in the construct of the authority being more corrupt than the prisoners, this movie doesn't let those things over shadow it's heart and soul. Sensitive direction and fine performances make Shawshank an early, and unrivaled, classic.

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8. Vertigo (1958)
(PG)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock
Starring: James Stewart and Kim Novak

Nominated for 2 Oscars



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The one I'd seen for the first time most recently of all the movies resting in my top 10. When I watched Vertigo, I immediately rewatched it that same night, and then 2 more times the next day. I don't know if I've ever done that with a movie before. But I am as obsessed as the films protagonist. There are a lot of movies on my list that go out of their way to deeply explore human psychology, movies that meditate on madness, obsession, loss, greed and violence. Movies that dare to peak at the darkest faces within the human body. Vertigo, by Alfred Hitchcock, does this better than just about any movie. This is an unpredictable, scary thriller that also takes it upon itself to be a meditation on love, loss and human comfort. This movie was a critical and box office failure upon it's release, it destroyed the beautiful friendship of Jimmy Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock (Stewart was set to star in Alfred's next movie, North By Northwest, but was quickly replaced by Carey Grant after Alfred blamed Jimmy for Vertigo's failure.) Yet, today, with very good reason, it was widely considered one of the greatest movies of all time.



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7. The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy (2001-2003)
(PG-13)

Director: Peter Jackson
Starring: Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortenson, Sean Astin, Liv Tyler, Andy Serkis, Karl Urban, Orlando Bloom, Hugo Weaving, Christopher Lee and Cate Blanchette

Winner of 17 Oscars between all 3 films; Including Best Picture and Director



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If you were mad that I was cheating with Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows, this is REALLY going to bother you. I don't even feel good about this. But it is what it is. This is the greatest movie trilogy of all time; disagreeing with me is futile. Filmed as one, 12 hour long movie, then edited to 3 separate, slightly shorter movies, this is the biggest movie game changer I've gotten to see in my lifetime. I remember being 10 years old and watching the first one with my dad and friends in the theater... and how ever year, Dad, brother and I would eagerly await the release of the next one. These movies flourish with personal sentimentality for me; but they are also undisputed masterpieces that will be remembered as long as we are making movies!


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6. Good Will Hunting (1997)
(R)

Director: Gus Van Sant
Starring: Matt Damon, Robin Williams, Ben Affleck, Minnie Driver, Casey Affleck and Stellen Skarsgaard


Winner of 2 Oscars; Including Supporting Actor (Williams) and Original Screenplay


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Matt Damon and Ben Affleck are now some of the most famous faces currently breathing the same air as us mere mortals; yet in 1997 most people didn't know who they were. Before Ben was Batman and one of the best directors of his generation, and before Matt Damon was Jason Bourne and one of the best actors of his generation, they were two south Boston boys with a perfect screenplay they had crafted together. What is seen is a menagerie of wit, heart, talent and inspiration. Not to mention Robin Williams finest and most tender hour. Possibly the most uplifting movies on this list, Good Will Hunting gets my eyes watery and my heart soaring more than most movies out there. 


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5. Psycho (1960)
(PG-13)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock
Starring: Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh and Vera Miles

Nominated for 4 Oscars; Including Best Director and Supporting Actress (Liegh)



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We have officially arrived at my all time favorite horror movie! Psycho is the best representation of the brilliance that was Alfred Hitchcock I have ever seen. This movie pushed the bar so much with audiences back in 1960, people were outraged at the sexuality and violence portrayed in it. But this isn't a mind numbing, senselessly violent trash can. Hitchcock, though obviously demented, never lets it get out of hand. You always know you are under the careful control if the director. Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins deliver legendary performances, and Psycho is the greatest horror movie masterpiece of all time.


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4. The Godfather Part 2 (1974)
(R)

Director: Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro, Robert Duvall, John Cazale, Talia Shire and Diane Keaton

Winner of 6 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Director and Supporting Actor (DeNiro)



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Here we have arrived at maybe the greatest movie of all time. This mafia saga set new standards for sequels. It goes deeper than its predecessor in analyzing the twisted mentalities of these men who pervert the capitalist system for their own gain. I believe it is also richer in texture, and gives even more evidence of social awareness. A tale of loss, grief and absolute loneliness, an unflinching stare into the darkest moral abyss. The performances are pitch perfect, from Robert DeNiro (winning his first Oscar) as a young Vito Corleone to a horrifying Al Pacino, who never once asks for the audiences sympathy, but through his suggestive performance demands the movie. I'm obviously bias because I love it so much, but The Godfather Part 2 might be the objectively best movie ever made. 



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3. The Dark Knight (2008)
(PG-13)

Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Michael Cain, Aaron Eckhart, Gary Oldman, Maggie Gyllenhall, Anthony Michael hall and Morgan Freeman


Winner of 2 Oscars; Including Best Supporting Actor (Ledger)



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While no sequel has ever bested The Godfather Part 2, The Dark Knight definitely matches it. It's hard to imagine now, where dark and moody super hero movies aren't really welcomed (Sorry Zac Snyder, but at least I'm in the minority who enjoys your movies.) But when The Dark Knight came out, nobody had ever seen a super hero movie with so much.. humanity. The stakes were real, the performances were real (greatest movie villain performance of all time!), you got a sense of spirit from these characters. Watching it, even today, and it's hard to imagine this came from a comic book. I don't want to just say it's my favorite batman movie ever made, or even super hero movie, but my favorite crime drama. I predict that decades from now, people look back on The Dark Knight as the game changer for super hero movies that Star Wars (1977) was for sci-fi.


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2. Stand By Me (1986)
(R)

Director: Rob Reiner
Starring: Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell, Keifer Southerland and John Cusack.

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Best Adapted Screenplay



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Choosing between any of my top 4 to be my number 1 pick was an impossible endeavor. But I feel comfortable with where Stand By Me sits. I was a youth pastor for 5 years, I worked in Young Life, in high school Special Ed. and now as a Residential Counselor for Looking Glass, a program designed to rehabilitate troubled youths. Youth are the future and now of the world. To help a kid, to guide and love one, is to place an investment on the future of our country. So it cannot be overstated how vital it is that we understand them. No movie has ever done a better job at getting inside the hearts and minds of teen aged boys like Stand By Me. When I was a kid, I at one point identified with all of these kids, now as an adult I see the kids I've pastored, mentored and counseled in these characters. This movie isn't a perfect movie by any means, in fact some moments are just down right sloppy, but it put independent movie making on the market. It showed that lower budget movies with no special effects and lots of heart still have something huge to offer. Stand By Me is a beautiful look at adolescents, one that I will never forget.


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1. Tree of Life (2011)
(PG-13)

Director: Terrence Malick
Starring: Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain and Sean Penn

Nominated for 3 Oscars; Including Best Picture and Director



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We have now, finally arrived at my all time favorite movie. The Tree of Life. If you know me, you know that my faith, wrestling with God and theology, are at the very core of my person-hood. Tree of Life is the beautiful on screen representation of what that internal struggle. Reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey, it's not for everyone. It follows no narrative structure, you don't get from point A to point B by narrative standards. It tears down the constructs of traditional film making just as it tears down the constructs of mans idea of God. Rather, this movie is a song that doesn't resolve, a sacrament of sweet incense to heavn, a theological statement that the human experience may feel God is distant, but he exists in the cosmos, in the trees and in our hearts. No leaf falls without the Father knowing of it because in a way, He is in the leaf, He is in His creation. It is because He is in His creation that He is able to reconcile creation back to Himself. That's the picture this movie paints. It is a journey from doubt and chaos to the place of healing and reconciliation. I've seen this about nine times since it's release, and every viewing leaves me more breathless, more moved and shedding more tears. Tree of Life is an experiment in film making, it takes risks that might leave a lot of audience members feeling isolated, but no movie have I ever seen that resonates so strongly with me and my faith journey, and that is why Tree of Life is my favorite movie of all time.

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So there you have! My 100 favorite movies of all time. It's been a lot of fun taking on this project, thank you so much for riding along and providing input!

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