Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Top 100 part 3: 80-71!



Here we are! Part 3 of 10 of a series on my 100 favorite movies of all time! This has been a lot of time and research but I'm so excited to finally start publishing them.

Here's a couple things to keep in mind.

1. This is a FAVORITES list, not a BEST list. I'm hardly qualified to make a best of list. So there will be movies on the list that are admittedly sloppy, but I love them. As well, there are masterpieces out there that I have seen and just really didn't like. So you wont see Citizen Cain or Raging Bull here.

2. I am 24 years old who has obviously not seen all the movies, and, like everyone else, am inclined to like movies more from my generation. So while there are a few older movies on here, I'm attempting to abandon pretension and go with what resonates with me the most.



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80. The Breakfast Club (1985)
(R)

Director: John Hughes
Starring: Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Judd Hirsch, Alley Sheedy and Anthony Michael Hall





There is, I believe, very good reason that this is one of the most beloved movies ever made. This profound glimpse into high school life broke down stereotypes and revealed the raw turmoil, profound depth and genuine humor that lives within youth. As relevant today as when it came out 31 years ago, The Breakfast Club forever changed the landscape of depicting high schoolers in American cinema.


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79. Harvey (1950)
(G)


Director: Henry Koster
Starring: James Stewart and Josephine Hull

Winner of 1 Oscar, Best Supporting Actress: Josephine Hull






There are 3 actors I am quick to call my favorite actor of all time: Daniel Day-Lewis, Tom Hanks and James Stewart. Harvey is Jimmy at his best. Playing the mentally ill Elwood P. Dowd, Stewart brings his typical charm and charisma to the role, but he also brings a surprising amount of depth to this whimsical comedy. Harvey is a beautiful meditation on lifes gifts and blessings; one that always ends with me in tears.

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78. Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)
(PG-13)

Director: JJ Abrams
Starring: Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Adam Driver, Harrison Ford, Oscar Isaac, Domnhall Gleeson, Lupita N'Yongo and Carrie Fisher

Nominated for 5 Oscars






I am more than happy to take any garbage people throw at me for this, but this is the my favorite of all the Star Wars movies! Not only is by far the best acted one ever made, but it has an amazing female lead in a time where they are a dime a dozen, thought provoking story, and completely captivates the viewer from beginning to end. I know the purists will come out of the wood work to fight me for this, but I've never loved a Star Wars films more.


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78. Seven. (1995)
(R)

Director: David Fincher
Starring: Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwenyth Paltrowl and Kevin Spacey

Nominated for 1 Oscar



Before David Fincher did The Social Network, Gone Girl or Fight Club, he did Seven. A horrific and brilliant detective story about two cops, an aging vet near retirement played by Freeman and a new colt played by Pitt, on the haunt for a serial killer who targets his victims according to the seven deadly sins. This mind bending, edge of your seat thriller is a detective movie at it's best, and showed the world what it could expect from the brilliant mind of David Fincher.


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77. Alien (1979)
(R)

Director: Ridley Scott
Starring: Sigourney Weaver, John Hurt and Ian Holm

Winner of 1 Oscar





In space, no one can hear you scream. That is the tagline for one of the greatest sci-fi/horror movies ever made. And it does a perfect job encapsulating the terrifying, claustrophobic atmosphere of the movie that put Ridley Scott on the map. We are at the directors mercy in Alien, not to mention wowed by a star making performance from Ms. Weaver.



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76. Spotlight (2015)
(R)

Director: Tom McCarthey
Starring: Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schrieber, John Slattery and Stanley Tucci

Winner of 2 Oscars; including Best Picture






The first time I saw Spotlight, I was wowed and silenced. The second time I saw it, I had to hide in the movie theater restroom afterwards and sob for a few minutes. As a deeply religious man who has spent most of my career working with children, this movie struck a chord of outrage in me. It is one of the most powerful and important movie watching experiences I've ever had. In a year that saw masterpieces like Mad Max Fury Road, Room and The Revenant nominated for Best Picture, perfect performances and directing, an air tight script and a impeccable treatment of a very important moment in religious history make Spotlight the well deserved winner.

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74. Pulp Fiction (1994)
(R)

Director: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Jon Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel, Quentin Tarantino, Tim Roth and Christopher Walken

Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Original Screenplay





Put 4 people in a room and get them to talk about the best movies they've ever seen, Pulp Fiction is going to come up. There is a reason this is so many peoples favorite movie of all time, and one of mine. Quinton Tarantino brings his sharp dialogue, layered characters and violent storytelling more profoundly here than any of his other movies. Pulp Fiction is a masterpiece, and there is no denying it is one of the most influential movies of all time.
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73. The Truman Show (1998)
(PG-13)

Director: Peter Wier
Starring: Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney and Paul Giamatti

Nominated for 3 Oscars, including: Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Harris) and Original Screenplay





The first time Jim Carrey showed us he was so much more than just a comedian was in the Truman Show. A Sci-fi dramedy about a man who. unbeknownst to him, has had his whole life staged for the most successful reality TV show of all time. Smart, funny, moving and border-line prophetic, The Truman Show is one of the most marvelous movies the 90's had to offer, and one of my all time favorites.
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72. Full Metal Jacket (1987)
(R)

Director: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Matthew Modine, Vincent D'Noferio and R. Lee Ermy

Nominated for 1 Oscar; Best Adapted Screenplay




If you follow me on Facebook at all, you know I have some strong convictions about warfare and violence. So, yeah, it's weird that I love war films, but I do. Very few war films moved me more than this. Directed by the legendary Stanley Kubrick, we are given a picture painted of the Vietnam war as only Stanley could paint. Funny, heartbreaking and some of the best cinematography in movies history make Full Metal Jacket must see viewing for any movie buff.

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71. The Philadelphia Story (1940)
(G)

Director: George Cuckor
Starring: Katherine Hepburn, Carey Grant, James Stewart.

Winner of 2 Oscars; including Lead Actor (Stewart) and Screenplay




This is shockingly and unfortunately, the only Oscar Jimmy Stewart ever took home. Thankfully it was a well deserved win. Stewart, Grant and Hepburn give some of the most hysterical performances ever filmed in this love triangle rom-com. The script is fast pace and almost every joke lands. Philadelphia does more than just make you laugh though, this unqualified classic captivates you with it's movie-magic, reminding you of why you love movies at all.

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