Sunday, August 21, 2016

Top 100 movies of all time part 7! 40-31!



Here we are! Part 7 of 10 of a series on my 100 favorite movies of all time! This has been a lot of time and research but I'm so excited to finally start publishing them.

Here's a couple things to keep in mind.

1. This is a FAVORITES list, not a BEST list. I'm hardly qualified to make a best of list. So there will be movies on the list that are admittedly sloppy, but I love them. As well, there are masterpieces out there that I have seen and just really didn't like. So you wont see Citizen Cain or Raging Bull here.

2. I am 24 years old who has obviously not seen all the movies, and, like everyone else, am inclined to like movies more from my generation. So while there are a few older movies on here, I'm attempting to abandon pretension and go with what resonates with me the most.




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40. The Sixth Sense (1999)
(PG-13)


Director: M. Night Shyamalan
Starring: Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment and Toni Collette


Nominated for 6 Oscars; Including Best Picture, Director & Screenplay (Shyamalan), Supporting Actress (Colette) and Supporting Actor (Osment)





These days M. Night is sort of a joke (though I loved last years The Visit). It's hard now to believe that he was hailed as the next Hitchcock back in 1999. A fact hard to understand until you watch the movie that gave him this all to temporary title. The Sixth Sense is the movie the planted the seed in me of appreciation of honest, real and authentic movie making. Watching the documentary on the DVD as a 10 year old changed the way I watched movies forever. This movie is a masterpiece in horror cinema.


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39. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
(PG)

Director: Elia Kazan
Starring: Vivian Leigh, Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter and Karl Malden


Winner of 4 Oscars; including: Best Actress (Leigh), Supporting Actor and Actress (Malden and Hunter)




Tennessee Williams is my all time favorite play-write, and A Streetcar Named Desire is a legendary play and movie in equal measure. Featuring, possibly, the finest film performances anyone had seen up to that point. It is a painful, hectic and poetic meditation on the nature of madness and the carnal side of humanity. It was also, at the time, one of the most offensive movies made in America, being attacked by censorship boards for it's portrayal of depression, sexuality and (implied) rape. Though not nearly as provocative nowadays as it was at the time of it's release, A Streetcar Named Desire remains a staple in American cinema and is one of the most finally crafted movies of all time.


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38. The Green Mile (1999)
(R)


Director: Frank Drabont
Starring: Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Sam Rockwell, Barry Pepper, Bonnie Hunt and James Cromwell


Nominated for 4 Oscars; Including: Best Picture and Supporting Actor (Duncan) 





Is it possible to make a movie that is a scathing critique of the death penalty and beautiful art at the same time? Yes. And it's called The Green Mile. This is one of the most underrated movies of all time. Featuring performances from a group of stupidly talented actors in their prime, beautiful, patient and raw story telling, and a very important message, The Green Mile is one of the best, and the most underrated movie from the 90's.




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37. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)
(G)

Director: Gary Trousedale
Starring: Tom Hulce, Demi Moore, Kevin Kline and Jason Alexander

Nominated for 1 Oscar.





Movies that I find ridiculously underrated seem to be the big theme of this list. My number 37 spot proudly goes to the most underrated Disney movie of all time. Now I understand the backlash, the G rating and "Disney" label severely mislead many audiences into thinking this is a movie for children. While kids love cartoons, and ALL kids should hear this movies message, it is darker than your average Disney animated feature. Tackling such controversial subjects as abuse of power, tolerance, prejudice, religion and lust; this movie does it all with beautiful music and animation, and an important and relevant message about what it means for the last to become the first.


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36. Saving Private Ryan (1998)
(R)


Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Edward Burns, Tom Sizemore, Vin Diesel, Giavoni Ribisi, Adam Goldberg, Bryan Cranston and Paul Giamatti

Won 5 Oscars; Including: Best Director.





Easily one of the greatest war films of all time, Steven Spielberg's World War 2 masterpiece was, at the time, the most realistic portrayal of war yet. It set the standard for war movies, and used a style many after would try to mimic. This harrowing journey into the heart of darkness graphically reveals the brutal nature of war and violence. Choosing not to celebrate the violence and refraining from turning his soldiers into action figures, Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan is a masterfully shot and perfectly acted event.


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35. Taxi Driver (1976)
(R)

Director: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Robert DeNiro, Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks and Harvey Keitel

Nominated for 4 Oscars, Including: Best Picture, Lead Actor (DeNiro) and Supporting Actress (Foster)





The second movie on this list to tackle the trope of descending into madness, here is the movie that really put legendary director Martin Scorsese on the map. Riding the success of Mean Streets, Martin reteams with DeNiro and Keitel to bring us this dark and violent 1970's odyssey. In this story of man who is equal parts kind hearted and equal parts dangerous, Robert DeNiro gives one of cinemas finest performances, not to mention it earned a young actress her first Oscar nom, Jodie Foster. Taxi Driver is often hailed by many viewers as one of the greatest movies of all time, and there's good reason for it.

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34. Memento (2000)
(R)

Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Guy Pearce, Joe Polito and Carrie Anne Moss

Nominated for 2 Oscars; Including: Best Screenplay




This is the best mystery, who-dun-it movie I have ever seen. Period. Christopher Nolan's first masterpiece demands to be seen. Believe me, the less you know going into this, the better. Just, if you haven't yet, go watch Memento five or six times; you'll pick up new pieces of the puzzle with every viewing.

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33. Casablanca (1942)
(PG)

Director: Michaeul Curtiz
Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid and Peter Lorre

Won 3 Oscars; Inclduing: Best Picture and Director




When I think of "Classic hollywood films" Casablanca is the first movie my brain jumps to. This is probably one of the highest quality movies on my list. Romantic, mysterious, controversial, adventurous, funny and tragic; Casablanca defined it's era. This movie, 70 years later, is a landmark in pop culture. You have almost definitely seen Casablanca homaged, copied or parodied in some way, shape or form. Look, if you claim to be a movie buff and you haven't seen Casablanca it'd be real easy to call you a poser. Plus, it is President Obama's favorite movie (I almost didn't type that because I know there are people petty enough to let that fact taint their judgement of this movie) Grab a box of tissues, pop some popcorn and watch the movie that set the standard for all movies to follow.

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32. Schindlers List (1993)
(R)

Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes and Ben Kingsley

Won 7 Oscars; Including Best Picture and Director





Schindler's List is Steven Spielberg's magnum opus. Told with expert craft and imagery, this passion project very likely opened the worlds eyes to the reality of the Holocaust for the first time. Featuring outstanding performances, a honest and flawed hero and the cruelest of villains, Schindler's List is one of the most important movies ever made.

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31. Eternal Sunshine of A Spotless Mind  (2004)
(R)

Director: Michael Gondry
Starring: Jim Carrey, Kate Winselt, Kirsten Dunst, Mark Ruffalo, Elijah Wood and Tom Wilkinson

Won 1 Oscar





In his most honest and real performance, Jim Carrey captivates audiences in this romantic/sci-fi/comedy/drama. This modern classic is heartbreaking and hilarious; a meditation on the nature of heartbreak and vulnerability, and our sometimes inability to navigate through it all. This is an entirely unique and beautiful film, and, obviously, one of my all time favorites.



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