Thursday, August 11, 2016

Top 100 favorite movies of all time part 4! 70-61


Here we are! Part 4 of 10 of a series on my 100 favorite movies of all time! This has been a lot of time and research but I'm so excited to finally start publishing them.

Here's a couple things to keep in mind.

1. This is a FAVORITES list, not a BEST list. I'm hardly qualified to make a best of list. So there will be movies on the list that are admittedly sloppy, but I love them. As well, there are masterpieces out there that I have seen and just really didn't like. So you wont see Citizen Cain or Raging Bull here.

2. I am 24 years old who has obviously not seen all the movies, and, like everyone else, am inclined to like movies more from my generation. So while there are a few older movies on here, I'm attempting to abandon pretension and go with what resonates with me the most.



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70. Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows part 1 and 2 (2010 and 2011)
(PG-13)

Director: David Yates
Starring: Daniel Radcliff, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Maggie Smith and Alan Rickman


Between the two films, nominated for 5 Oscars








I know, it's absolutely cheating to combine two separate theatrical releases and count them as one movie. So keep in mind that I know I'm cheating and that this wont be the last time you see me cheat this way on my list. If you have a problem with it you're more than welcome to go make your own top one hundred favorite movies and format it however you want; but this is mine so sod off.


 My defense is such: these movies are not a complete narrative on their own; but they were filmed like one movie and if watched together, back to back, you have one of the greatest conclusions to one of the greatest franchise's of all time. David Yates has such a crystal clear vision for this movie; capturing a deep and moody atmosphere and always maintaining a level of tension, like a volcano is about to explode, through out this whole finale. Managing to insert equal parts character development and heart-stopping action, Deathly Hallows part 1 & 2 work best when viewed together, and you wont be sorry you did. *
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69. Rebel Without A Cause (1955)
(PG)


Director: Nicholas Ray
Starring: James Dean, Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo


Nominated for 3 Oscars; including by supporting actor and actress for Mineo and Wood.






James Dean only did 3 movies before his tragic death. Yet, he is one of the most recognizable faces in Hollywood history. He is also the only actor in Hollywood history to receive 2 Oscar nominations after his death. His success goes unprecedented to this day. While I loved East of Eden, and it just barely misses out on my top 100, Rebel Without A Cause is one of the most important depictions of youth I've ever seen. Capturing the rage, depression and pressures that often came with being a youth in the idealistic 1950's; Rebel Without A Cause spoke to a generation, and continues to speak to generations, about what it's like when you don't fit the mold the world tries to force you into. This is a powerful and important film, and a landmark in cinema culture.

 
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68. The Prestige (2006)
(PG-13)

Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale, Michael Cain, Scarlet Johanson, Rebecca Hall, Andy Serkis and David Bowie.


Nominated for 2 Oscars






I'm laying my cards out right now, Christopher Nolan is my favorite living director. Every time this guy releases a movie it is an event for me and my friends. The first film of his I saw was Batman Begins, and I thought it was solid. Then in 2006 I saw The Prestige, and was blown away. Over the next ten years I have probably watched it 15 more times, and am blown away EVERY. TIME. Christian Bale gives one of the most masterful performances I've ever seen, and Hugh Jackman proved to the world this guy has much more to offer than Wolverine. However, these phenomenal performances are up staged by the top notch story telling and impeccable direction. Christopher Nolan is the best story teller working in the business, and I can't fully divulge why here because I don't want to spoil this for anyone who hasn't seen it. If you have seen it, you know exactly what I'm talking about; if you haven't seen it GO WATCH THIS MOVIE! Stop what you're doing, don't even finish reading this list, go watch The Prestige.

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67. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Next (1975)
(R)

Director: Milos Foreman
Starring: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Christopher Lloyd and Danny DeVito



Winner of 5 Oscars: Best Picture, Director, Lead Actor, Lead Actress and Screenplay





Sometimes funny, often times sad, always very, very, dark. One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest isn't for everyone, but for the lovers melancholy story telling, like myself, it is a powerful treat. Capturing the allegories that made the novel so controversial and ground breaking; this movie is a showcase of great directing and even better acting.


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66. Jaws (1975)
(PG)

Director: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Roy Schieder, Robert Show and Richard Dreyfuss


Won 3 Oscars.





Seems pretty cliche to have Jaws on my list. Do you know why Jaws is on so many lists? Because 41 years later it's still one of the scariest and most suspenseful movie watching experiences of all time. The film ages remarkably well, showing that Spielberg's first blockbuster was well ahead of it's time. This movie isn't overrated. It's just that good.

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65. Network (1976)
(R)

Director: Sydney Lumet
Starring: Peter Finch, William Holden, Faye Dunawau, Robert Duvall and Beatrice Straight


Winner of 4 Oscars, including: Lead Actress (Dunaway), Lead Actor (Finch) and Supporting Actress (Straight) and Best Original Screenplay






"I'm mad as hell, and I'm not gonna take it anymore!" Network is what I call prophetic art. Perfectly capturing, and satirizing the times it takes place in. Post Watergate, Post Civil Rights Movement, Post Vietnam; needless to say in 1976 people were still restless, and had some very much warranted trust issues. Network was the offensive move to call out Network televisions neglect of covering matters of substance, and the shocking ending drives it's message deep. This is one of the best acted and written movies you are ever, EVER going to see. Don't believe me? Take a look for yourself.
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64. Unforgiven (1992)
(R)

Director: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Clint Eastwood, Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris


Winner of 4 Oscars, including: Best Picture, Director and Supporting Actor (Hackman)






Westerns: The genre where violence is celebrated and the good guys are the ones who kill and do it without a badge to make it legal. Clint Eastwood offers and bleak and convicting commentary on the genre he helped popularize; showing a "good guy" who has killed plenty and is full of remorse and regret. Taking away all the glamour westerns claimed, Unforgiven is a deep, contemplative and moving picture about the nature of violence and the toll it takes on a mans soul.


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63. Pinocchio (1940)
(G)

Director: Hamilton Luske
Starring: Dickie Jones, Christian Rub and Mel Blanc

Winner of 2 Oscars





Walt Disney's second full length animated feature (after Snow White) is rarely rivaled. Playing at as a funny, sad and sweet morality tale, Pinocchio is a classic in the deepest sense of the word. If you need a better reason, see it for the ahead of it's time animation and beautiful music.


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62. There Will Be Blood (2007)
(R)

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson
Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano

Winner of 2 Oscars, including: Lead Actor (Day-Lewis)






Daniel Day-Lewis is the greatest actor of all time. Period. It's not Brando, DeNiro, Pacino, Hanks or Washington. Sorry. No better evidence is there for my bold claim than There Will Be Blood. There are no adjectives to properly describe the work Daniel does here; I'll settle for mesmerizing. Paul Dano more than holds is own and they shine in the very capable and visionary hands of it's director. I'm a sucker for tactful messages in movies and this one packs a wallop! Showing us that when ambition becomes more important than your soul and when the church seeks power over service, there will be blood.

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61. The Babadook (2014)
Not Rated

Director: Jennifer Kent
Starring: Essie Davis, Noah Wiseman



If you haven't figured out that I'm a sucker for metaphors by now, this is probably the only list you've read. On the surface, The Babadook is your typical, albeit extremely well done, slow burn horror movie. You could say that's all it is; and you'd be wrong. This is a profound exploration on the nature of grief, and how destructive it can be when you don't allow it to have it's process, and that it never leaves. It will always be with you; but eventually you learn to live with it. Watch The Bababdook and you'll know what I'm talking about.

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