Friday, August 12, 2016

Part 5 of 10: Top 60-51 of Favorite 100 Movies of all time!

Here we are! Part 5 of 10 of a series on my 100 favorite movies of all time! This has been a lot of time and research but I'm so excited to finally start publishing them.

Here's a couple things to keep in mind.

1. This is a FAVORITES list, not a BEST list. I'm hardly qualified to make a best of list. So there will be movies on the list that are admittedly sloppy, but I love them. As well, there are masterpieces out there that I have seen and just really didn't like. So you wont see Citizen Cain or Raging Bull here.

2. I am 24 years old who has obviously not seen all the movies, and, like everyone else, am inclined to like movies more from my generation. So while there are a few older movies on here, I'm attempting to abandon pretension and go with what resonates with me the most.



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60. Braveheart. (1995)
(R)

Director: Mel Gibson
Starring: Mel Gibson, Brendan Gleeson and Brian Cox.

Winner of 5 Oscars; including: Best Picture and Director




My dad was an amazing athlete in high school and college. He didn't have his first son, me, until he was 41. Ironically, I showed little to no interest in sports at all. Rather than being disappointed in this fact (or if he was, he never gave me that impression) my dad sought out a different way to connect with me. The chosen medium: Movies. I love movies for their own merit, but I also love them because they represent to me my fathers love and desire to connect with me. One of the first movies this happened with was Braveheart. Mom was out playing Bunco with her friends and so we watched a movie she normally wouldn't have allowed me to watch. I love Braveheart for this reason. There are aesthetic reasons to love it as well. To some, Braveheart is nothing more than your standard epic. To me, it is a beautifully shot, exciting story about taking a stand for justice and having the willingness it takes to sacrifice for a just cause. This fictionalized story of William Wallace is moving, funny and tragic, and well worth a watch.

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59. Born on The Fourth of July (1989)
(R)


Director: Oliver Stone
Starring: Tom Cruise, Kyra Sedwick, Tom Berrenger and Willem Dafoe


Winner of 2 Oscars; including: Best Director





A message piece? You betya. But it's an important message. Daring because it takes you on an in-depth look at the way war can effect some one in a dangerous way. The story of deconstruction and reconstructing a mans patriotism is harrowing, heartfelt and important. In a day and age where our options for country leadership are less than desirable, where the credibility of politicians and their intentions has never been lower, Born on The Fourth of July has never been more relevant. Deserving of it's controversy, this is the best movie legendary director Oliver Stone has contributed to cinema, and the same goes for Tom Cruise. 

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58. Skyfall (2012)
(PG-13)

Director: Sam Mendes
Starring: Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Ralph Fiennes, Naomi Harris, Ben Wishaw, Albert Finney and Judi Dench


Winner of 1 Oscar





To me, this is so obviously not just the best James Bond movie ever, but the best spy movie ever. I know that's a not a very cultured statement, and James Bond purists might take issue with it. But I'm not a James Bond purist; I just love movies. Compelling narrative, rich and developed characters, a convincing script and rock solid directing are all I ask for, and Skyfall delivers on this better than most movies ever.

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57. Sling Blade (1996)
(R)


Director: Billy Bob Thornton
Starring: Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight Yoakam, John Ritter and Robert Duvall


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Adapted Screenplay




You want to watch one of the greatest performances of all time? Watch Sling Blade. Billy Bob is spectacular here (and, sadly, not in much else). Often times funny, often times heart wrenching, often times deeply disturbing. Those are three elements that rarely correlate without creating a disgusting mess of a movie... Yet this movie blends these three elements to create a nearly perfect work of art that will stay with you long after it's over. One of those movies that's impossible for me to watch without shedding some tears.

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56. Don't Look Now (1973)
(R)

Director: Nicholas Roeg
Starring: Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie






You ever watch a movie you had never heard of up to that point, and then realize you stumbled upon one of the greatest pieces of cinematic art ever filmed? Welcome to my experience watching Don't Look Now. This is one of those movies you watch over and over again, each time peeling back a new layer. The cinematography for this movie is absolutely stunning, the themes of grief and how it transforms a marriage thoroughly explored and an eerie and haunting atmosphere are only part of what makes this one of the most impressive movies ever made. Add to it a director with a vision so clear and a skill so refined that he executes it perfectly, heartbreaking and raw performances from Julie Christie and the criminally underrated Donald Sutherland, and an ending so shocking and haunting it'll sit with you for days; and you have one of my favorite movies of all time!
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55. Doubt (2008)
(PG-13)

Director: John Patrick Shanley
Starring: Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Viola Davis


Nominated for 5 Oscars; Including Lead Actress (Streep), Supporting Actress (Adams and Davis), Supporting Actor (Hoffman) and Adapted Screenplay.





When the head nun of a catholic school in the 1960's suspects that one of the students is being molested by the charismatic and lovable perish priest, it takes her on a journey that reveals that deep within her lies something she thought was cast far away from her: doubt. One of the best acted movies you're ever likely to see, doubt explores its heavy and relevant themes in A+ style of film-making. Sit back, and enjoy the best in the business giving their best.

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54. Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (1967)
(PG)

Director: Stanley Kramer
Starring: Sydney Poitier, Spencer Tracey and Katherine Hepburn

Winner of 2 Oscars; including: Best Actress (Hepburn) and Screenplay





One of those rare masterpieces that defies genre. Extremely controversial upon its release; Guess Who's Coming To Dinner works as a romantic comedy, a family drama and a civil rights move. Forcing the predominantly white fans of Hollywood legends (and real life lovers) Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn to confront the depths of their own prejudice, this movie is a landmark in civil rights film making. Showing a racism that exists not in aggressive violence or overt oppression of rights, but one much more prevalent in our day. The racism and prejudice we keep hidden until we are forced to confront it. This movie works on so many levels, and one every person should see.


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53. On The Waterfront (1954)
(PG)

Director: Elia Kazan
Starring: Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Eva Maria Saint, Rod Steiger and Lee J. Cobb


Winner of 8 Oscars; including: Best Picture, Director, Lead Actor (Brando) and Supporting Actress (Saint)





Though a joke in his later years, Marlon Brando is considered by many the first great method actor in Hollywood. With the likes of Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro and Ryan Gosling calling him their biggest influence; that should give you an idea of the amazing talent that Brando exuded. Brando took home his very first Oscar for this unprecedented masterpiece. The story of a washed up boxer who is down on his luck and forced to work on the waterfront, Terry soon takes on the injustices in his neighborhood with the help of a priest (played Karl Malden, the best actor you never heard of). The story of redemption and justice is deeply moving, and the two strongest elements of this monumental movie are the shocking performance of Marlon Brando; who plays Terry like an exposed nerve; and the tense direction by Elia Kazan. On The Waterfront is widely considered one of the great Hollywood classics and with very good reason.
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52. Goodfellas (1991)
(R)

Director: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Ray Liotta, Robert DeNiro, Joe Pesci and Lorrain Braco


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Supporting Actor: Joe Pesci.






Yeah, this movie is amazing as everybody has been saying for the last 25 years. In fact, it is so well loved I'm sure the same people who wanted me castrated for having Pulp Fiction lower on my list will come at me of not having this in the top 20. And the quality of the film warrants such a reaction. There's just 51 movies out there I like more than this. Martin Scorsese is easily one of the greatest directors of all time, and Goodfellas snub of best picture and director to the snooze fest Dances With Wolves was atrocious. There isn't anything to say about this that you haven't already heard; if you consider yourself a movie buff and you haven't seen Goodfellas you simply haven't earned your stripes yet.

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51. Boyhood (2014)
(R)

Director: Richard Linklator
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke


Winner of 1 Oscar; Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Arquette.




Boyhood will go down in history as one of the greatest American cinematic achievements of all time. I'm calling this now. Richard Linklator filmed is coming of age epic; a story about a young boy who grows into adulthood; over a period of 12 years. Using the same cast over the 12 year process; they would get together for a few weeks once a year until the completion of the project. What is portrayed on film is the most accurate story of a young man coming into his own ever filmed. The risks and payoffs in this movie are unprecedented; and what we are giving is a hypnotic odyssey of growing up.

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